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Learn Why Loving Your Pets Is Vital To Their Health

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Author: Stephanie Andrew


Having a close loving relationship with your dog is vital for your dog's health. It may sound silly and you may not think your companionship plays a big role in your dog's health, but in actuality, it plays an even bigger role than a good dog insurance policy.

Companionship is vital to any pet and especially dogs, because dogs are very social animals who have an instinctive need to be with the one they love and care for all times. When you bring new dog or puppy into your home, you and your family become his new family. It is a natural instinct for dogs to be with their pack at all times. When separated from their pack and they come with us to live in their new home they immediately associate us in their mind as their new pack.

They Don't Want To Be Without You

Your puppy or dog will want to spend all of their time with you no matter what you are doing. They will go to any lengths to catch your attention. For example, when I am reading and the paper on the bed my dog will hop on the bed and lay down right on top of the paper to distract me so he can get all my attention. Your dog wants all your attention; he wants 100% of you at all times - not just a pat on the head every now and then. He wants to be your forever best friend.

DSA - Dog Separation Anxiety

Just like babies and toddlers, dogs suffer from separation anxiety. Sometimes dogs can be more clingy and demanding than children! Dogs have a strong need for companionship. Sometimes they panic, thinking the members of their pack have abandoned them, and this can lead to a range of problems. Many dogs when left alone for extended periods suffer from separation anxiety which can be very distressing for them, their owners and even their neighbours. Extreme cases of separation anxiety can lead to problems which may need to be treated by a vet and cause you to claim on your dog insurance. Some symptoms of dog separation anxiety are the following:

- Chewing the furniture

- Barking excessively

- Going to bathroom in the home

- Obsessive behaviour

- Any other type of destructive behaviour

What Should You Do If Your Dog Suffers From Separation Anxiety

If your dog displays anxiety and acts up while you are away, do not punish your dog. He is not trying to get back at you for leaving him alone. Your dog just has not yet learned that there are times when you cannot take him with you. Just like if you have a toddler and you go out for a little while the child will begin to panic and cry, so will a dog, especially a young puppy. When you do go out the best way to prevent your dog from experiencing feelings of anxiety is to prepare him for this. Separate your dog from you and leave your dog in another room for a certain period each week. Start by leaving your dog alone for just a few minutes. Then increase the time slowly to a half-an-hour to an hour and so forth. After a while your dog will begin to understand that you will come back home eventually and you just have to leave for a little bit. His fear of being alone will begin to lessen and eventually your dog should stop having anxiety separation attacks.

Time Out for the Bad Puppy

If your dog misbehaves continually despite your perseverance and patience, you could try to put your dog in his crate for a ten to fifteen minute timeout. Most dogs do not appreciate being confined to a crate involuntarily. Using a crate to help teach them how not to behave can be a resourceful way to train a dog, if done correctly. Each time the dog repeats the undesirable behaviour, you can put them in the crate for a certain amount of time as a way to communicate your displeasure. Eventually the dog should stop misbehaving because they know that if they do misbehave then they get a timeout in the crate. Your dog will learn from past mistakes what is acceptable and unacceptable behaviour.

However, do be careful not take this scolding too far. Ignoring your dog, locking him in the basement or leaving him outside longer than necessary can be very harmful to a dog emotionally and physically. You run the risk of de-socialising and severely stressing your dog if he is left isolated for too long, so don't go overboard. Stress can deteriorate anyone's health - animals or humans. Use your common sense, and if in doubt, consult your vet who should be able to put you in touch with a local dog obedience training class.

Bonding With Your Doggie

Now that you understand how important it is to love your dog as he love you, spending quality time with your doggie will create a special bond between you that nobody will be able to replace. Here are some simple tips to help you develop a tight bond with your dog and help your dog become an active, healthy and happy pet:

- Take your dog for long walks

- Play games together

- Teach your dog tricks

- Groom your dog regularly

- If you're able, try to take your dog on holidays with you

- Allow your dog to socialise with friends and family members in your home and whilst out and about

- Take training classes together which you can participate in too

- Buy pet insurance to protect your pet against unexpected illness and injury

Remember to give your dog plenty of love and attention. Spending time with your dog will be a rewarding experience for the both of you. Love goes a long way and no one will cherish your love more than a dog.

About the author: Animal Friends Pet Insurance is the only UK pet insurance company which donates 100% of their net profits to animal welfare organisations around the world. Visit www.animalfriends.org.uk to find out more.


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